The Blackberry 10 is out – will it be enough to save Blackberry?

Image from www.blackberry.com

After several delays, and a lot of media attention the BlackBerry 10 from RIM Blackberry is finally available, but will it be enough to save the former darling of mobile device computing?  For a long time Blackberries were the preference of business users around the world and even carried them into personal use devices, but after years of stagnant development, it may not be enough.  Most of the hardcore Blackberry owners I know, who for a long time really opposed Apple and Android devices have now switched, and love the eco systems they are a part of the way they used to love their Blackberry.  The device, from demos and pictures certainly looks solid and their licensing of Active Sync means that you no longer require software to access corporate email either through a Blackberry Enterprise Server (BES) or personal desktop software which was absolutely the right thing to do or these devices would be completely irrelevant.   I wonder, with iThings and Androids already dominating the market, and Windows Phone which is a very solid mobile device (I’m not sold on Windows 8 for computers yet but the phones are great) struggling to gain traction, is there enough room for Blackberry to survive?  Will you switch back to Blackberry, either personally or at work?

 

LightWire partners with Cybernetics to bring enterprise class storage to small and medium business in the Boston market

LightWire, Inc. has entered into an agreement to become a certified reseller of Cybernetics storage and backup appliances.  “The partnership with Cybernetics allows us to offer our clients high performance storage systems that were once only within the budget of large enterprises.  This agreement allows us to be strategically positioned to help our customers expand their virtual, non-virtual and private cloud environments” said Ian Findlay, founder of LightWire, Inc.

LightWire was founded in 2005 by Ian Findlay, whose long career as a technology consultant, manager, and innovator positioned him to observe how small businesses continually struggle to effectively and efficiently manage the technology within their companies.

Since running a small business typically means that the staff wears ‘many hats’ and perform many different jobs, the job of managing IT is frequently given to the person who knows the most about it. With LightWire, you can turn over that responsibility to a highly skilled team at a fraction of the cost of hiring full time employees.

With LightWire, your company not only gains access to skilled people to manage your company’s technology, but also to a suite of services typically reserved for larger organizations – from hosted applications to collaboration tools to offsite data backup, you can quickly increase the impact technology has on your company and its customers. Since LightWire purchases equipment and software on behalf of all of its clients, we can leverage our increased purchasing power to deliver lower prices and flexible billing schedules on hardware and software purchases.

Cybernetics (www.cybernetics.com) was founded in 1978 and headquartered in Yorktown, Virginia, Cybernetics is a privately held corporation specializing in the design and manufacture of high performance disk, tape, and virtual tape storage solutions. Their product line features cutting edge technologies which have been rigorously tested to deliver seamless compatibility and solid reliability, along with innovative – and exclusive – features that provide greater functionality, data accessibility, and return on investment than any other storage solutions provider can match.

Should We Upgrade to Windows 8

I guess I have two answers to that question.

We are frequently asked by our clients if they should be considering implementing Windows 8 within their company. Our default answer, at the moment, is definitely ‘no’. The reasons for this are many, but largely revolve around the training / up skill requirements for people to work productively with the platform. Certainly, there are many benefits to Windows 8 – speed, security, new communication paths / social networking, built-in email / calendar / contact support for Microsoft Exchange (ie, no Outlook required if you don’t want it), and integrated support for Microsoft’s online services to name a few. But – at the end of the day, people need to be productive with their computers, and without some significant re-learning, they will be much less productive with Windows 8.

From a personal level – I definitely encourage upgrading, or at least purchasing the upgrade (if you aren’t planning on buying a new computer in the near future, this is a significant deal). Personally, I think it is critically important to stay currant with as many of the major new technologies as possible. And, well – its fun! I have been using a Windows Mobile phone for several months (A Nokia Lumia 920) and love it. Yes, it has fewer apps than the Galaxy S III that I abandoned shortly after buying it, but that gap is closing. And, importantly, it is rock solid and totally integrated into social media channels. The same can be said for Windows 8, so it is a very engaging operating system. I am looking forward to purchasing a Microsoft Surface Pro when it is released at the beginning of February to better test Windows 8 on a purpose-built Intel-based touch screen device. More on that later!

New to Windows 8? Check out these shortcuts for easier navigation

Here are some keyboard shortcuts that will help you move around Windows 8 a bit easier:

<Windows> Brings up the Metro start screen. You can start typing to search for an app, just like the Win7 start menu.

<Windows> + <B> Go to the Desktop from the Metro Start Screen

<Windows> + <D> Brings you to Windows desktop from the Metro Screen

<Windows> + <Tab> Opens the Metro application switcher menu, switches between applications.

<Windows> + <J> Switches focus between snapped Metro applications.

<Windows> + <R> To bring up the run window from the desktop, so you can type in an application name to run

<CTRL> + <+> Zoom in <CTRL> + <-> Zoom out or hold down <CTRL> and use Mouse Wheel to zoom in and out

<Windows> + <C> Brings up the Charms menu, where you can search, share, and change settings.

<Windows> + <Z> Opens the App Bar for the current Metro application.

<Windows> + E – Launch Windows Explorer with Computer view displayed.

<Windows> + F – Brings up the Metro File search screen.

<Windows> + H – Opens the Metro Share panel.

<Windows> + I – Opens the Settings panel, where you can change settings for the current app, change volume, wireless networks, shut down, or adjust the brightness.

<Windows> + K – Opens the Devices panel (for connecting to a projector or some other device)

<Windows> + L – Lock PC and return to Lock screen.

<Windows> + M – Minimize all Windows on the desktop

<Windows> + O – Locks device orientation.

<Windows> + P – Choose between available displays.

<Windows> + Q – Brings up the Metro App Search screen.

<Windows> + R – Switch to the (classic) Windows desktop and display the Run box.

<Windows> + U – Switch to the (classic) Windows desktop and launch the Ease of Access Center.

<Windows> + V – Cycles through toasts.

<Windows> + W – Brings up the Metro Settings search screen.

<Windows> + X – Launch Start Menu.

<Windows> + Y – Temporarily peek at the desktop.

<Windows> + Page Up / Down – Moves tiles to the left / right.

<Windows> + , (comma) – Aero Peek at the desktop.

<Windows> + Pause/Break – Opens up your system window

<ALT> + <F4> Close an application

Originally posted by DrConnery via Reddit http://www.reddit.com/r/windows/comments/128hif/windows_8_advice_learn_the_shortcuts/